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Archive for the ‘Edinburgh’ Category

first weavings of the semester // the high mill

In Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art, Interesting things, Weaving on October 15, 2015 at 6:37 pm

It’s been a busy, blog-free, fewe weeks. Somehow it’s October. I finished the metadata weaving I started a while ago, I’ve started writing my dissertation, I’m about to buy a knitting machine, and I’ve been working with LEAPS for the last week, so I’ve not been in the studio a whole lot (except at odd times). We were down at the Heriot-Watt School of Textiles yesterday and, minus the incredibly vomit inducing coach trip there, it was amazing. I’ve never seen so many looms in once place. AND SO MUCH YARN. I think I was far more excited than any of the students – we had a machine knitting workshop yesterday, hence the sudden buying of one. It’s super amazing. And my data-weaving can be translated into data-knitting, because I’m going to buy one that uses punchcards and it’s all about numbers and oh my it’s so good. Punchcards! I can’t afford a loom that uses them, but I can knit with them! I’m considering trying to get a second supervisor for my (hypothetical) MPhil from Heriot-Watt, becasue they have an amazing weaving studio and I could do with the technical advice.

Anyway. Pictures from yesterday, then weaving.

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A lot of time has passed since I started writing this post…as in I started in my lunch break and it’s now 18:35 and I’m hungry. So I’ll do the long explaining thing some other time, maybe tomorrow morning. ALSO, Martin Creed is doing the Friday Talk tomorrow, how good is that?! So here we go, a traditional pattern, and my own pattern made from making the other pattern.

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I got a loom sized table made. Life is so much better and more comfortable.

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Right. The first rather dark cycle home of the year, and food.

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Hello, final year

In Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art on September 24, 2015 at 2:47 pm

Somehow it’s September. Somehow it’s 2015. Which means next May/June it’ll be degree show and in the summer I’ll graduate. I’m decidedly not counting the months – or days. In terms of introductory things it’s probably the least stressful year, because we’re all in denail and avoiding even mentioing the words ‘degree’ and ‘show’ in the same sentence. I’m sure it’ll be fine.

It’s strange to be back in a studio, I’ve been in and out the art school all summer working at degree show/masters festival/open days (last open day of the year on Saturday…), but now I have a space again. A pretty huge space (perks of being a final year). Second years are off doing something else, and I’ve no idea where the third years are. I’ve seen more first years in our studio than anyone else I think. It’s kind of nice, but it’ll be a shock when they all come back in. Because there’s a lot of second and third years (us class of 2016 is a relatively tiny year, which I imagine has a lot to do with the sudden increase in tuition fees – given that probably the majority of students here are not Scottish/European). Anyway. Stuff on a wall, stuff to weave. I don’t have project space/research presentation for another six weeks.

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Our timetables are alarmingly empty, which was terrifying until I realised I much prefer working to my own timetable. So I’m blissfully happy now. And so far this week I’ve done everything on my timetable, more than can be said for any other year. We’ll see how long that lasts. This semester will probably end up being stupidly busy, it’s taken three years but (at the moment) I’m employed thrice by the university. I’m the ECA web writing intern for this semester, events assistant still and until Sunday working at the main library as a general advice point for freshers (favourite, and very common, question: “so are there books in the library?”). Which, very excitingly, means I have a pension – I’ve never felt like such an adult.

In other exciting news – CARGO TRIKE. I cycled the loom in yesterday – terrifying and I got a few odd looks. This morning I cycled in wearing my glorious cape with a rainbow and last bits of sunrise behind me. Yup, I came in early today.

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I’m having a break from reading (it started raining and it looks miserable and I did get quite a bit done this morning) and fiddling about with things to submit for a few bits and pieces. I’m waiting for Groundings Ancients to release their new themes for the year, I’m hoping I can re-use my visual culture from last year that I actually liked. I’m set on the extended/40 credit visual culture option, and I submitted my proposal a lot early. So now I’m twiddling my thumbs really and hoping what I’m doing is alright, we don’t find out our supervising tutors for a few weeks yet. I have been working on that propsal since May, so if it’s not alright I’ve wasted four months.

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doubleweave!

In Edinburgh, Weaving on May 17, 2015 at 5:01 pm

I’m still waiting on the book that should tell me how to do super huge doubleweave things (it’s out of print and hard to find without spending a lot). I got bored and decided to follow a less detailed pattern (as in, it gives you the threadings and doesn’t give any help beyond that). It’s the first pattern I’ve done from this book (because this is only the second “actual” weaving pattern I’ve done, the rest have been my own), very pretty book though. And Margo Selby seems to have a thing for doubleweave (she designs everything on a table loom before it’s done on a huge scale to make stuff).

I don’t really know what I’m doing or how/why it’s working, but it is working. There’s six patterns in the book that use the same warp threading, so I’ll just go through those until I run out of warp. It’s a deflected doubleweave (nope, no idea either). As far as I can tell (from the first pattern I’m doing) it’s making a piece of fabric that should be near enough identical on each side, not two separate pieces (which tube-ish doubleweave must make). But it’s a much more textured bit of fabric, because the pattern is made from floating threads (the raised bits), it feels quite nice.

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Warping is the same as usual, except I went a bit wild on the colours. Two colours make it easier to see the two different “blocks” of threading that make the front and back of the fabric, so the grey is one block and the pink/blue another. I thought it’d be difficult somehow, because I don’t have a second back beam on the loom, and the yarns are slightly different thicknesses, but it’s working fine so far. (Which is good, I wasn’t looking forward to having to buy a second back beam).

The threading is were it gets a bit complicated – each block has 4 shafts that make that pattern, and they alternate evenly. I guess it’s like doing two patterns at once, but they work together. I don’t know. It’s hard to know without having the book that explains everything…

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All the colours mostly so it’s easier to see where each thread is going, and also because the weft is really lovely soft merino. It’s a beautiful thing (maybe not a *meaningful* beautiful thing, but beautiful anyway), and it looks how it’s meant to. Expect more pictures, there’s a really amazing looking pattern coming up.

I think it will be possible to write my own doubleweave, it’ll probably take longer to write and make useable. And who knows how it’ll come out, these patterns tend to be very even/equal/balanced, and the ones I write… aren’t. In principle, it’ll work. Once I’ve got to grips a bit more with this we’ll see. Right. More weaving, this time with the colours from the warp, to see what that’s like…

Dissertation research is going slowly but pretty well – The Life of Lines came last week (the cover is really trippy), quite nice but not as thread-y as I’d hoped. Still useful. I started out with a very, very specific thing I wanted to look at, so I’m having to widen it out a bit so I can get 12,000 interesting words out of it. At the moment it’s quite heavy on the material culture side of things (which is a good thing because a) it’s interesting and b) I’ll probably get put with the supervisor I’d prefer). I have questionnaire plans in the not-so-distant future (I figured the more the merrier). I haven’t worked out a resarch question (or series of questions) yet. In fact, I can’t really articulate what it is I’m looking at/thinking about yet – more reading to be done. But it’s kind of… a thread-based ontology, understanding through (physical and metaphorical) threads. Can you tell I’ve been re-reading a lot of Tim Ingold lately? Pretty much any thread-based activity is based on ordering chaos – untangling, ordering, classifying, reshaping. Same as collecting. Ways of understanding and knowing the world. I can’t quite say what I mean, but something along those lines. It might turn out to be a load of rubbish, but hey, I’ve got ten months left to make it work.

The Life of Lines is more about an ontology of lines, and I was re-reading The cultural biography of things: commoditization as proces and came across this:

‘…the human mind has an inherent tendency to impose order upon the chaos of its environment by classifying its contents, and without this classification knowledge of the world and adjustment to it would not be possible.’

Kopytoff, I, p.70 in Appadurai, A. (1988), The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective

And so I decided thread-based onotolgy would be a good idea. It has nothing at all do with the fact that I like saying ontology. Anyway, weaving to be done.

weaving constituencies

In Edinburgh, Interesting things, Weaving on May 9, 2015 at 7:16 pm

I’m still maintaining that staying awake all of Thursday night was a good (if depressing) idea. (And I’m actually old enough to vote now, so that makes things a bit more interesting). Someone was cross-stitching the declarations as they came in…

So naturally, here’s some potential fabric. If I get bored during the week I might try it, although I don’t have all the colours… Or in fact, most of the colours. And it’s no fun without the colours.

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This is Edinburgh East (the constituency where I live, and where the art school is). Along the top/warp is total votes colour coordinated by party (it reflects back on itself). Not to scale! Although there is a lot of yellow. Maybe I should do a to scale version. Along the right/weft is percentage share of vote, again reflecting back on itself to make a prettier pattern. And the data…

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New election themed fabric…hm. Something to do though. Still waiting for books to arrive, so can’t start messing around with doubleweave yet. Yarn arrived for Em & j though, making fabric to go over the back of the fancy new sofa. It’s dates and will match (in colour and maybe a little in pattern) the print that lives above where the sofa goes. Square-y patterns are quite nice to do, and there’s a lot of small squares. The greys are actually quite different from each other in real life, the one in the middle is quite green-y grey. And the cotton on the end is two shades of pale yellow, not bleached out nothingness.

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In other excitement, the tulips I planted did survive (and are currently livening up the kitchen) and my Lupin seedlings are starting to appear too… It’s even more overgrown than when I moved in, but hey. Flowers! I threw a cornflower seed bomb in last week, and the forget-me-not one I threw in September seems to have worked, waiting for the flowers to open up. A lot of crap gets blown in from the building site next door, and it isn’t exactly peaceful. Maybe they’ll be done before I move out.

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Freedom… But not really.

In Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art on May 5, 2015 at 2:51 pm

We’re done for the year. That’s very, very scary.

Much has happened. I’ve shown work (in two places simultaneously…), almost caused serious injury weaving a lot in very little time and I don’t know what else.

I finished the work for Stanley Mills the day before, it had to be cut short because I ran out of cotton and time and it was very painful by the end. But it’s about 18 metres long, 2.5″ wide and wove in and out of pillars on the weaving floor. I’m pretty happy really – it looks how I imagined, it supported itself (so I didn’t have to interfere with the fabric of the building – thanks gravity) and it’s not at all separate from the rest of what I’m working on (last time, for Cultybraggan, what I made was so distant from everything else it was awful).

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It now looks like this. If it was comfy I’d use it as a cushion, but it’s pretty dense cotton. So it’s just a thing on the bookshelf of things.

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The other thing was for the first interdisciplinary ECA 3rd year show (bit of a mouthful), in the same place where we had our end of first year interdisciplinary show. Loops and loops.

Fabric from the Dryad loom (I couldn’t save it to continue weaving) and text. I even titled it (rare I know) – Loom of Destiny because I have a terrible sense of humour. I’m going to be a crazy weaving spinster with a lot of cats, and eventually someone will have to cut my last bit of weaving from my loom.

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Theoretically I’m free until September now. Realistically there’s a lot to do. I’ve taken over the living room as a studio (there’s a loom permanently out and three more in the cupboards), it’s quite nice really. Much cosier than the actual studios and I get to look out at trees. I’m catching up on patterns i didn’t get a chance to weave and (once some books arrive) I’m going to attempt to master doubleweave. Which is pretty much two bits of fabric at once. From what I can figure out without having read the books… you can do much more 3D things, and it’s apparently possible to weave something double the width of the loom. Which would be REALLY useful – that’d be about 30″ wide! Assuming that a) I can  understand how to do it and b) somehow translate that into my own patterns. We’ll see.

This is the last thing I did, it’s only small but it’s the most complicated pattern. There’s no repeats in the warp and each weft repeat is 111 threads. So this is one repeat, which with the wool I was using is about 28x13cm.

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The numbers are from when I was weaving the pieces for Stanley, every 10cm I’d write down the length and time. So this is all the data from weaving from 6m piece of fabric. And then when I do a full length bit of this (a couple of metres) I can take the measurements and times from that and make something else and something else and something else… In fact if I can’t figure out how to get doubleweave to work with my patterns, I can do the same thing with that. Weave a beautiful bit of ‘traditional’ fabric and then do the data from the bit of fabric and have them together.

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Post its of data.

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One repeat.

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I got distracted from the ‘everything else I’m meant to be doing’ part. I’ve sorted started dissertation research already, might as well use the next four months… I think I’ve decided to go for the longer, extra credit option (when I get it right, my essay grades are more reliable than studio grades and if I’m planning on applying for the MPhil course – more later – a longer thing will be more useful). I’m going to have to go through my essay from last semester (the object biography that went well) and pick some things from there, but I think it’ll be thread related. I’m looking for a very, very, very small ‘gap in existing’ knowledge that I can dig out. Also applying for things, I sent off an application for Selected 2015 this morning (I’ll be amazed if that ends well, but worth a shot).

I…think I’m going to apply for the art MPhil, to start either the September or January after I graduate. (No, not entirely because I don’t know what I want to do with my life…). In some ways it’s the best time to do it (because I’m here, I’d still have somewhere to live, if I find a nice little gap in my dissertation I can go wild with that), and in some ways not – I’d be going straight from undergrad to postgrad with four months gap in between (hence maybe January). We’ll see how that goes anyway. All the funding application deadlines are early next year, so I’ll have to have applied by the end of December at the latest to be able to apply for those. Advantage of having four months semi-freedom, I can start preparing now… (I’m not kidding, the application guidance notes are printed and stuck to the fridge). So that’s that. Lots of researching to do.

We found time to see some art though… Where Language Ends was really, really, really beautiful.

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Insert suitably punny comment about looms here

In Collections, Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art, Interesting things, Rambling, Weaving on March 7, 2015 at 1:10 pm

So I got…some looms. Three. I wasn’t expecting three, but that’s the joy of eBay. They came yesterday, very impressively all fitting into one box. A huge box.

I thought I’d got a slighter bigger table loom (although with less shafts) and an inkle loom (for weaving bands), turns out there was a rigid heddle loom in there too (it looked like a pile of sticks). It was a job lot of stuff, so there’s some random bits of crap (most of which came in two cat food boxes), some acrylic yarn that I probably won’t use and a lot of diy-ed stick shuttles (I don’t much like stick shuttles), and two pieces of fabric woven on the table loom. And the inkle loom came with the most rickety table, it’s more annoying than useful really. Think it’s just going to be easier to have it on an actual table.

Not many pictures because I was too busy a) going oh dear me what have I done and b) figuring out what belonged to what and c) cackling at the stack of knitting magazines that I didn’t ask for but got anyway. They’re brilliant. I’ll have to do something with them.

This is most of it.

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Also note the new warping frame – it goes up to 11m long! The rigid heddle is off at the side somewhere.

Both the inkle and table loom came with warps on, I tried using the warps on the inkle loom but the tension was so knackered it was pointless (so I very quickly strung it up and did a tiny little band, IT’S GREAT). With the table loom it looked like someone had just wrapped some thread around it in the hopes of making it look like it was working, what actually happened was the back apron (which is literally an apron on this, a piece of canvas and a stick that the warp is attached to before threading) had been cut off for some reason, and everything wound to the front apron. Untangle it all and you find a piece of weaving, I have plans for it. Again, it was acrylic and not worth saving to use again because it’s just not very nice to weave with.  (The pink thing on top is what I did on the inkle loom.)

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It looks like/was sold as a Dryad loom, but there’s no label thing anywhere that I can see – so who knows, and goodness knows how old it is. If it is a Dryad one that’s…freaky – Dryad was based in Leicester, that’s where I’m from innit.

I have absolutely no idea why someone thought screwing two bits of mismatched wood to the base was a good idea, wasn’t even level! The amount of dust and crud that came out when I took it off… There is absolutely no reason why you’d do that, it’s not like it was holding it together or anything, it was just holding crap in. The reed was pretty grim – in fact all of it was pretty grim, it still needs a bit of love. That yarn must have been on there a long time. But now it’s cleaned up it looks to be fine (which is good, I didn’t fancy trying to find a reed that’d fit). The shafts are a little on the rusty side, and the threads could probably do with being replaced, but they’re functional for now. I’ll need to diy something to stop one of them popping out of it’s track though. I’m going to need to get more heddles – but that can wait a while, simply because putting heddles on is going to be a nightmare (I’m going to have to unscrew the castle where the shafts sit and then somehow unscrew each shaft to get the heddles on). It doesn’t fold up like the first loom, but I should be able to unscrew it into two pieces.

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Theoretically it might be possible to have an extra four shafts made up to make it an eight shaft loom – there isn’t much space at the back, so it’d probably have to be two in front and two behind the existing four. It’d just make it a lot more flexible, and I could do more complex patterns on a bigger scale. It’s about 21″ across (instead of 16″ on the other one), so not a whole lot bigger, but noticeable. I really don’t have the sort of brain to figure it out (3d things aahhh!) but it should be possible…

I’ve come up with a solution for the missing back apron using a stick, a ring binder clip and lots of string. It’ll be fine.

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And this is the rigid heddle loom which is, in principle, very similar to the inkle loom (although INKLE what a word). It’s an old Spears one as far as I can tell (furious googling last night). Although you can use inkle looms for card/tablet weaving, which means text is possible! I can make labels! How nice would it be to weave title labels for bits of work…? Just me?

Anyway. It’s far less flexible than the table looms – there are only two options, up and down. For the inkle loom heddles are made from string and attached one by one as you wind the warp on, on this loom it’s just that white thing which also acts as the reed. There’s dents as in table loom reeds, but also holes, so lifting it up or pushing it down when it’s threaded changes the shed/gap you weave into. But you know what that means? Dot dot dash. I have no idea if threading it using morse code would work, but worth a shot. I can’t use the software I have to write drafts for the inkle or rigid heddle loom, so it’s going to be interesting…

I’ll leave you with a kitten.

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Data weaving/why weaving can be art

In Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art, Rambling on January 18, 2015 at 6:33 pm

If art school has taught me anything, it’s what I like.

Data, numbers, information
Recording and visualising mundane/useless information
Graph paper
Cats (…nah, I knew that already)
Making things for a very specific audience (usually one or two people)
Making ‘ambient’ work/things not intended for a gallery/white cube – things to be worn/used/lived in and with
India ink pens
Lines.
Threads.
Things that fit together perfectly. More so if they’re not made for each other.
Colour coding
Mindless/mindful pattern making

Weaving is all of those things (except cats) in one way or another. It’s perfect. Too perfect. The best bit is that weaving is a series of numbers that describe the way threads/lines fit together perfectly to become a surface. I MEAN WOW. Lines. Fitting together. Because of numbers! Aaaahhhh!

I use an eight shaft loom (you can get sixteen!). Weaving drafts are just a series of numbers. The threading pattern describes which shaft each warp thread belongs to, the lift plan is which shaft(s) to raise to make a gap in the warp threads to pass the weft thread through. Changing the gap (shed) over and over produces fabric. Lines squished together into something solid.

Any series of numbers can be altered to fit within the 1-8 range (yes, ideally it wouldn’t have to be altered. But I can’t really afford a sixteen shaft loom..). You just use multiple threads to make up the number. So, dates, coordinates, phone numbers, temperature, monetary values, ANYTHING NUMERIC can become a pattern. Anything. Isn’t that amazing? I could weave the fluctuations in the currency markets if I really wanted. And the best part – the fabric doesn’t look like the input.

I can’t reliably draw drafts by hand. It’s complicated and I can’t visualise that sort of thing very well. But there is software. And it’s amazing. I can only get a trial version of the one I love, because it’s a decade or so old and seemingly impossible to get ahold of the full version. Doing the drafts digitally (whilst quite removed from the whole handmade-ness of the rest of it) is really really really useful. Takes no time at all to come up with a useable, stable pattern.

I say stable, until recently I hadn’t figured a way around using drafts that repeat the same number consecutively. Turns out that was already a thing – overshot weaving. Between each line of the pattern you weave plain weave (under/over) so you’re making a piece of fabric and a pattern on top of the fabric. So you have two shuttles going at once, which got a bit tangly. But it means I can do even more things, and more textured things…

This is the draft of what I’m weaving at the moment – it’s mine & Steph’s birthdays 14219942071994 (but then reflected back to make a longer pattern). I tried it with other people and this was the nicest looking, clearly we were meant to be. Each little square is a thread. In the warp that I wound there were just under 200 threads (it was quite thick yarn) in 6″ or so. It’ll be a scarf for me, seeing as I haven’t made one for myself. And I’m using pretty much every colour and type of yarn that I have – so merino wool, wool, wool blends, cotton, recycled cotton, recycled sari silk, recycled linen and mulberry silk. Because the yarn is quite thick the finer details of the draft aren’t quite so visible.

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I got a bobbin winder for Christmas (AMAZING), so it no longer takes half an hour to wind a very loose bobbin. Always a good thing. It came with a load of bobbins and another shuttle (the wooden thing the bobbin sits in), so I can actually do overshot. Which is good. I bought a raddle too – I’d made a really shit one. But it was just too shit. And now the raddle matches the rest of the loom and will be pretty much indestructible.

More weaving…

A scarf for Em made from her date of birth…

 

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That was the longest (and probably the best) thing I’ve done so far. And the most recent finished thing.

Before Christmas I wove this…thing. I’m going to sew it into something eventually. That draft is based on the molecular structure of dopamine (long story, lets not go there…). Things have people have said about it: it looks like a tea towel, it looks unloved. I’m going to come back to the pattern I think. Different yarn.

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And the piece of fabric I made on the course… mindless pattern!

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I started an Etsy shop selling data scarves (you give me numbers, choose your dimensions and yarn and I weave you a scarf), I’m waiting on the yarn to arrive for my first order (eeeeekkkkk!). If I get a spare day at some point I’ll probably do a pre-made one to sell too (either more traditional weaving patterns, because I do love that zig zag, or something I’ve written myself. Or both.).

I got given a lot of merino yarn (factory seconds) and it’s so beautiful and soft. And came in skeins. Approximately 1kg skeins. To be wound by hand. I still haven’t finished winding the last one. I’m using the grey as the warp for my scarf, so far there’s only been one thread that likes breaking (it’s done it twice, the same one!). It doesn’t look too weird either, because it’s space dyed I was a bit worried it’d look odd in something that it wasn’t made for.

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I think that’ll probably do. Once the yarn comes for the next scarf I might do a more detailed ‘here’s how I do a thing’ thing. There’s reading to be done (three quarters through Wolf Hall, started 2015 with a bit of a Tudor theme. Two books into the Shardlake series).

Yup. Still here.

In Edinburgh, Edinburgh College of Art, Interesting things, Weaving on January 17, 2015 at 10:10 pm

I just forget how to write sometimes.

A lot of the time.

Well. The good news is that I didn’t fail last semester. The bad news is this week started with a talk containing the sentence ‘THIS IS YOUR LAST SEMESTER OF FREEDOM’. That was terrifying. (But true, this time next year… let’s not go there).

So. Stuff happened.

I spent one evening a week from September to December learning how to weave. I had to buy a loom because I loved it so much. And now I pretty much just…weave. (Conceptual weaving, it’s a thing now).

Before all that though… Otto.

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The loom came in a very small box. For something that takes up most of a table, it’s a very small box. And even though it folds flat-ish it isn’t exactly small (it does however fit in the flat, there’s a gap between two bookshelves in the living room that is just the right size. Although we probably need to get a new bookshelf to go there).

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It took days and days to build. Because me and instructions that are almost entirely pictures and no text is not a brilliant combination. BUT IT WORKS.

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Although when I say it fits in the flat… it takes up the entirety of the coffee table and/or dining table.

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It’s 16″ wide, so I am quite limited by size. Which I guess is good. Although I’m already going ‘oh the things I could do if I had a 24″ loom…” (blankets! that aren’t patchwork!). The length is less of an issue. The warping frame I had made up goes from about 1.5m to 3.5ishm.

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I’ll save the rambling explanation for another time I think.

I am still alive…

In Edinburgh on October 3, 2014 at 3:45 pm

Yes, yes. It’s been a little while. Stuff happened and somehow I don’t have any time left to sit down and write anything. But here we are. Only, what? Four, five months? So. Ehm. We’ll just fill some space with unimportant things. I almost moved down the road, did an about turn and moved somewhere else entirely with someone else entirely. Happiness ensued. But there we go. We have a garden. Next door have the most amazing door handle. The paint is peeling off our doorframe in a very satisfying way. IMG_1161 IMG_1358 IMG_1159 IMG_1124   Also TARDIS bedding, because why not. IMG_1157 I’ve officially become a third year (aaaaggggghhhhhhhh). New studio space. I started walking a lovely greyhound. I survived the festival (and went to a grand total of two things at the book festival). I got older (no longer a teenager). We went to Glasgow and were sad outside GSA. I submitted work into two exhibitions over the summer (The Dark. Outside. and A Letter In Mind). I went to see Neil Gaiman in July and it was AMAZING. IMG_1468 Now that’s all the important things out of the way I’ll go try and write something work related…

sea/studio/cat

In Books, Edinburgh on June 19, 2014 at 3:40 pm

Again… mostly pictures. (It’s hot, I don’t like hot. I start melting).

I went back to where I walked north last year, except I didn’t walk this year (it was raining and horrid at the start of June). It was pretty much how I remembered it, which I wasn’t expecting for some reason. I sat on the wall and finished a book (The Falling Sky). No real reason I went back, other than I’d just finished The Old Man & the Sea and missed the sea. Good a reason as any I suppose.

 

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did get back into the studio – last week or the week before. It’s odd that there’s no people (everywhere is so quiet), but nice. Desk made it back too, so I’m pretty much set until September when I’ll have to move to a different studio. But that’s okay. I was getting a bit stir crazy only being at home or in the shop, so it’s good to have a third place to wander to (and on my way in I could dog leg via a bookshop, which isn’t often because otherwise my bank account would be empty as an empty thing). Not that I’m actually doing much in the studio.

I started drawing colouring pages, based on diagrams from mathematical proofs. Well, one in particular so far. I was reading Sciencia. as you do, it’s basically GCSE/A level Maths, Chemistry, Biology and Physics squished into one book with a pretty cover. I’m not entirely sure why I bought it, probably something about patterns (oh yes, it’s from the same series as the book on harmongraphs I was reading). Anyway. The proof for he formula that says for polyhedrons faces (F) + vertices (V) – edges (E) = 2 is a series of lovely little cubes full of dots and lines that gradually get smaller and smaller.

(Ignore the fourth one on the top row, I forgot I was supposed to be removing lines).

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I love graph paper far too much. Ehm. They make great colouring in pages anyway, I’ll probably do more soon-ish. I was going to say tomorrow, but we’re off to see the GSA show tomorrow. So probably not. Anyway, pretty patterns from pretty diagrams.

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Also… I got a tent for the studio. Again, it seemed like a really great idea at one point. But then I sat in it and realised how insanely hot it is. Apart from that… I have somewhere to hide (there’s too much open space in here!) and it’s colourful and squares. Maybe I’ll keep it all year and not just for the summer. If the squares were squint it’d be perfect.

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I’ve forgotten what else I was meant to be doing. Oh, Otto! So cute.

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I left for five days and the teeny pepper I’d left growing on my windowsill became something actually resembling a pepper. And there’s more flowers! Maybe by August there’ll be peppers I can eat… It should be happy in the kitchen in the new flat (only a few weeks til we move, can’t wait) seeing as there’s a window (we don’t currently have one of those).

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I don’t know what else… I started playing Minecraft (amazing, really. I just love destroying things, very cathartic, and dying my hundreds of sheep different colours). I didn’t know hand drawing maps of individual worlds was a thing, but apparently it is. I got quite excited about maps again, maybe more maps. A map would probably help, I have to leave trails of coloured carpet everywhere so I don’t get hopelessly lost again. I’m not really doing anything other than removing a large proportion of the trees (my sheep decided it’d be a great idea to live in the trees, I disagreed), I’ll get to the point eventually.

I finished Invisible Cities and Cloud Atlas (eventually), started The Name of the Rose (finally) and Foundation. Start of July I’m seeing Neil Gaiman (aaahhh should be AMAZING), and next Tuesday tickets go on sale for all the book festival events. Fingers crossed I’ll get at least some (there’s a lot I want to go to, George R. R. Martin, Haruki Murakami, Hans Ulrich Obrist…I could go on). I just need to read The Wind Up Bird Chronicle before August…

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